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Head of Institute: Prof. Oren Froy

Administrative manager: Ms. Yael Fruchter

Office Address:
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Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment,
The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 
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S-Nitroso- N-acetylcysteine (NAC-SNO) as an Antioxidant in Cured Meat and Stomach Medium

Citation:

Kanner, J. ; Shpaizer, A. ; Nelgas, L. ; Tirosh, O. S-Nitroso- N-acetylcysteine (NAC-SNO) as an Antioxidant in Cured Meat and Stomach Medium. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 2019, 67, 10930-10936.

Abstract:

The stability of lipids in meat products depends on the initial concentration of hydroperoxides, the catalytic involvement of metal ions and myoglobin, endogenous antioxidants, and biological and technological factors. Ground meat was treated with additives, sealed in vacuum bags, heated to 75 °C, and stored opened to air at 4 °C. S-Nitroso-N-acetylcysteine (NAC-SNO) at concentration like nitrite used by the industry prevents lipid peroxidation in the product, even after storage for 1 month at 4 °C. The same simulated treatments at different concentrations of both compounds show that NAC-SNO acts as an antioxidant ∼4-fold better than nitrite at pH 6.2 or 3.0. Ascorbic acid significantly improves nitrite antioxidant effect. NAC-SNO was found to prevent, much better than nitrite, accumulation of reactive aldehydes and hydroxynonenal protein modification. In condition like those used by the industry for meat products processing, NAC-SNO acts better than nitrite to provide antioxidant protection without the side effect of N-nitrosation, oxidation, and the loss of nutrient generated by nitrite. © 2019 American Chemical Society.

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